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Extremity Adjusting: An Interview With Dr Mark Charrette

Dr Mark Charrette (chiropractor) has been a busy man. Over the course of his chiropractic career, he has notched up nearly 1,800 seminar speaking appearances. It’s an impressive number, all in service of an area of chiropractic that he is passionate about – extremity adjusting. According to Dr. Mark, it’s an area that shouldn’t be…

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D.D. Palmer’s Chiropractic Theory of Neuroskeleton

The neuroskeleton is a unique chiropractic model developed by DD Palmer. In 1995, Gaucher, Wiese, and Donahue acknowledged that Palmer was one of chiropractic’s greatest theorists and yet the profession has never made use of his concept of the neuroskeleton as a regulator of tension and of the subluxation as “a mishap that interferes with…

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Stress: The Brain-Body Connection

The concept of adaptation is one that is central to health and indeed to the chiropractic profession. We know the human body adapts to survive on a daily basis. We see this when we encounter a virus and the body adapts to shut it down. It also occurs when we have a fever and the…

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Fidgeting Is Good For You!

  Story at a glance New studies suggest fidgeting is actually good for us. Fidgeting while sitting can protect the veins in the leg and possibly help in the prevention of vascular disease. Keeping in mind that fidgeting, whilst enormously valuable if you can’t walk around, is no substitute for standing or walking which produce…

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Can A Brain Scan Work Out How Smart You Are?

Story at a glance 1.     New advances in MRI scanning reveal the level of intelligence in the brain. 2.     The more that different parts of the brain frequently connect with each other the higher the person’s level of IQ and creatively is. 3.     This has the capacity to markedly advance the technology of Artificial Intelligence.…

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New Scanning Technique Shows More Of The Brain Than Ever Before

  Story at a glance By combining four different scanning technologies researchers have been able to ascertain an unprecedented level of precision in identifying areas of the brain Whilst different scanning techniques show different sections, say connectivity or specialisation, what we haven’t been able to do up until now is to accurately compare the scans…

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Being Bored Is Good For Kids

Story at a glance 1.    Extracurricular activities may be depriving your children of using their innate imagination and intelligence. 2.     Psychologists are suggesting that over scheduling kids is unnecessary and ultimately a disservice to them. 3.     Boredom is crucial for developing internal stimulus, which then allows for true creativity.  “Mum I’m bored!” It’s probably the…

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Can You Catch A Cold From Being Cold?

Story at a glance Scientists at Yale University have been studying the effects of the rhinovirus, the common cold virus. The rhinovirus multiply far more aggressively in colder temperatures than they do at higher temperatures. Our antiviral response system is lower in colder temperatures and more robust at higher ones. Winter has well and truly…

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Listen To Your Gut Part 1: The Second Brain

Story at a glance The human gut has a brain of its own. Scientist are now calling it the ‘second brain.’ Gut instinct is a biological function of the ‘second brain.’ 90% of your body’s serotonin lies in your gut. We’ve heard it a dozen times if not a million. Trust your gut instincts; listen…

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Denmark, The World’s Happiest Country.

Story at a glance Denmark rated happiest place to live by UN World Happiness report after rating highest in seven categories. They have strong economic growth that is harnessed by paying high taxes that are used to support the general community at large. They have a national word Hygge that means self-care, cosiness and enjoying…

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6 Ways To Increase BDNF

Think of BDNF as a high performance protein powder that helps you build muscles at the gym, but for your brain cells. Instead of it influencing the size of your biceps it influences the quality and quantity of your brain cells. Your brain pumps out a series of neurotrophins. Neurotrophins are a family of proteins…

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The Doorway Effect

  Story at a glance:  Walking through doorways does really cause us to forget Events are processed one at a time and concentrating on something takes up most of our thought processes Different parts of memory compete with each other Ever had that moment where you walk into a room to get something only to…

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Living Low Chemical – The Cosmetics Edition

The quest for health and wellness has many of us heading down the road of the organic or low chemical. It’s a smart choice, as pesticides and herbicides are thought to have some very real effects on health. But often, it’s the little things that sabotage our organic efforts. Ground zero can be cosmetics –…

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Struggling To Remember? Repeat It Out Loud

Did you have to sing the alphabet song to learn it? Or perhaps recite the times tables out loud. These tasks were commonly met with more than a few eye-rolls, but it turns out the teachers were on to something. A study recently published in the Journal of Consciousness and Cognition revealed that the simple…

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