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Shoulder

Clinical Trial Shows Improvement Of Pain & Mobility For Shoulder Impingements After Cervicothoracic Manipulation

Shoulder pain is a problem remarkably common in the general population, with some experts claiming it lies second only to low back pain in terms of prevalence [1]. Risks for shoulder impingement injuries/syndromes include repetitive activities at or above the shoulder line, making this a problem particularly poignant for sportspeople or manual labourers among others.…

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Dr Michael Hall Part 1: Brain Diversity – How The Sexes Differ

Diversity and equality are two buzzwords often heard in conversations about pay, human rights, and more – and for good reason. In many areas, the human race has such a long way to go. But according to Dr Michael Hall, a world-leading chiropractor and functional neurologist, the healthcare industry is one where diversity has not…

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Why Be Behind The Science That Is Consistent With Our Philosophy?

At the recent Dynamic Growth Congress, we asked some leading voices in chiropractic why it is important to invest in quality research into the vertebral subluxation. Here, Dr Mark Postles talks about some key questions that underpin our approach to the profession and the knowledge base that we need to back it: are we an…

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Walk

Go For A 90 Minute Walk In Nature. Science Says So.

An increasing percentage of the modern population is housed and surrounded in an urban area, and this is trend is tipped to continue. While there are many benefits to urbanization, there is one curious downside. It has been associated with increased levels of mental illnesses like anxiety and depression, though it’s not yet clear why…

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Vagus Nerve Stimulation, Cytokines And Rheumatoid Arthritis

Of all the cranial nerves, the vagus nerve is perhaps the most fascinating. It’s the longest of the class, containing both motor and sensory fibres, and has the widest distribution through-out the body. It is said to influence many aspects of physical function, from speaking and swallowing, to muscle control, taste and many other aspects…

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Chiropractic Care For Plagiocephaly Cohort Study Released

Plagiocephaly has been called “The most common craniofacial problem today,” by the Royal Children’s Hospital [1].  The disorder is that of a misshapen or asymmetrical head shape often seen in newborns and infants as the thin, flexible bones of their heads are affected by lying on one side more than the other. A newly released…

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Volunteer

Volunteerism Linked To Improved Health

Volunteerism has long been touted as ‘a great thing to have on your CV.’ It also reaps many rewards in terms of contribution, which is recognised by success coach Tony Robbins as a critical human need. But a recent study looking at 40,000 European citizens highlighted another benefit: volunteering is associated with better health outcomes…

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Update The Textbooks: There’s A New Organ In Town

Scientists at the University of Limerick in Ireland have conducted a review which has resulted in a strong proposal for the reclassification of the mesentery. That’s right: it appears there’s a new organ in the body. Whilst it hasn’t officially been reclassified yet, momentum is underway with reputable publications such as Gray’s Anatomy jumping aboard…

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Optimising Mental Performance – The Chimp Theory

The science of human performance is a fascinating area spanning many disciplines. From sports and exercise to nutrition, neural-plasticity and mindset, there seem to be many roads to go down if you are interested in this area. Where does one begin in order to understand it all? The human brain, the master controller of the…

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Furry Pets Impact Infant Microbes

They say a dog is man’s best friend. But new research emerging from the University of Alberta claims that they may also be infant’s best friends when it comes to the risk of allergies and obesity.  Researchers have discovered a link between the presence of a pet in the household, and an infant’s microbiome. Their…

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Men's Depression

Men’s Depression Is Different

The more time and research march on, the more we understand about depression. We now know there are implications for gut health and that there may be immune system links, along with the more commonly known symptoms such as persistent low mood, sleep problems and changes in appetite and interests. Adding to this understanding is…

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Flame Retardants: A Safety Perk Or Health Hazard?

Since they made their first tentative forays into the textile world in the 1970’s, flame-retardants have become so common they are almost implicit. We rarely see ‘low fire danger’ tags announcing the presence of this chemical cocktail. Rather, we see tags announcing ‘high fire danger.’ What would you rather buy to put on yourself or…

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What to Watch: Wellness Trends In 2017

Every year, health trends develop and change. Among them are fads worth discarding, a touch of common sense come back to visit us, and often a nutritional gem or two. What are you likely to hear from your practice members and friends this year in terms of health trends? Here’s the scoop. In recent years,…

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An Apple a Day Keeps the Nephrologist Away.

Food is medicine. Genius, right? Well, in line with this old adage, a new study has some news for us: three or four servings of vegetables daily can have an incredible effect on kidney health. In fact, “Kidney disease patients who eat three to four more servings of fruits and vegetables every day could lower…

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