May 18, 2017

Update The Textbooks: There’s A New Organ In Town

Scientists at the University of Limerick in Ireland have conducted a review which has resulted in a strong proposal for the reclassification of the mesentery. That’s right: it appears there’s a new organ in the body. Whilst it hasn’t officially been reclassified yet, momentum is underway with reputable publications such as Gray’s Anatomy jumping aboard the reclassification bandwagon.    Once upon a time, the mesentery was treated as a fragmented structure. Parts of this structure included the ascending, transverse, descending and sigmoid mesocolons, along with the mesoappendix and the mesorectum. These tissues were individual structures that bore similarities in that […]
May 16, 2017

Optimising Mental Performance – The Chimp Theory

The science of human performance is a fascinating area spanning many disciplines. From sports and exercise to nutrition, neural-plasticity and mindset, there seem to be many roads to go down if you are interested in this area. Where does one begin in order to understand it all? The human brain, the master controller of the body, seems like a good place to start. Dr Steve Peters is a psychiatrist who has spent many years working in the field of elite sport. His twist on the issue of optimising human performance is an interesting one; he calls it The Chimp Model, […]
May 16, 2017

Study Shows Neurofeedback And HRV Have Robust Effect On Anxiety And Depression

In fields like chiropractic, we talk a lot about the brain and neuroplasticity. In many chiropractic clinics, tools such like HRV (heart rate variability) are used to measure and mitigate sympathetic drive. Practitioners of this particular technique will be fascinated to know that that on March 16, the journal NeuroRegulation published a ground-breaking study that showed just how robust a combination neurofeedback and HRV can be when applied to anxiety and depression symptoms.  While many of us in chiropractic circles may be familiar with HRV, the issue of neurofeedback may be a little less familiar. It is a ‘non-invasive brain […]
May 11, 2017

Furry Pets Impact Infant Microbes

They say a dog is man’s best friend. But new research emerging from the University of Alberta claims that they may also be infant’s best friends when it comes to the risk of allergies and obesity.  Researchers have discovered a link between the presence of a pet in the household, and an infant’s microbiome. Their research reveals a decrease in risk for overweight and allergic disease.  The study might seem somewhat unique in its subject matter, but it adds to a fascinating area of investigation as we are only just beginning to understand the impact of the human gut microbiome […]
May 9, 2017
Men's Depression

Men’s Depression Is Different

The more time and research march on, the more we understand about depression. We now know there are implications for gut health and that there may be immune system links, along with the more commonly known symptoms such as persistent low mood, sleep problems and changes in appetite and interests. Adding to this understanding is something that might not be rocket science, but that we should all pay attention to; depression symptoms can be vastly different in men and women, and research starting to support the distinction. According to the American Psychological Association, men are far less likely to seek […]
May 9, 2017

Flame Retardants: A Safety Perk Or Health Hazard?

Since they made their first tentative forays into the textile world in the 1970’s, flame-retardants have become so common they are almost implicit. We rarely see ‘low fire danger’ tags announcing the presence of this chemical cocktail. Rather, we see tags announcing ‘high fire danger.’ What would you rather buy to put on yourself or your child? It’s an obvious choice, that is, until you know what studies are beginning to reveal. It turns out flame-retardants might not be so innocuous, especially for children and babies. Flame-retardants are in our upholstery, electronics, soft furnishings, mattresses, car seats and even clothes. […]
May 4, 2017

What to Watch: Wellness Trends In 2017

Every year, health trends develop and change. Among them are fads worth discarding, a touch of common sense come back to visit us, and often a nutritional gem or two. What are you likely to hear from your practice members and friends this year in terms of health trends? Here’s the scoop. In recent years, we have seen a few interesting trends emerge. Among them was the resurgence of the fermented food category – think kombucha, sauerkraut, and the like. We started to see them pop back up on store shelves and Instagram feeds as people started to pay attention […]
May 2, 2017

An Apple a Day Keeps the Nephrologist Away.

Food is medicine. Genius, right? Well, in line with this old adage, a new study has some news for us: three or four servings of vegetables daily can have an incredible effect on kidney health. In fact, “Kidney disease patients who eat three to four more servings of fruits and vegetables every day could lower their blood pressure and their medication costs,” the research suggests [1]. The study, presented at the American Society of Nephrology’s Annual Kidney Week [2], looked at 108 patients with high blood pressure. All participants in the study were taking similar doses of blood pressure drugs, […]
May 2, 2017

Systemic Review Examines Best Practice for Chiropractic Care and Older Adults.

A systematic review and consensus update recently published in the journal Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics has taken aim at an important topic for chiropractors as we deal with an increasingly aging population. Currently, 15% of chiropractic patients are over the age of 60 [1]. With the World Health Organisation advising us that the number of people in this age group will double by 2050, it’s a good time to reflect on what best practice is for this cohort [2]. The World Health Organisation’s report raises a good point, in that major societal changes will be required as our population ages. […]
April 27, 2017

What’s the secret to a happy life? Harvard Has Tracked it Down.

“Whoever said money doesn’t buy happiness doesn’t know where to shop,” once quipped Mae West. It’s an interesting statement. If our collective goals as individuals and as a society are to accumulate more stuff… houses, cars, holidays, clothes, the list is endless, surely money must be the source of all happiness and therefore it’s lack, the source of sadness? The researches at Harvard1 dug a little deeper to find out what having a happy life really means. And by dug, we mean, over a period of 75 years, into the lives of two groups of men, in the worlds longest […]
April 26, 2017

Inspirational Chiropractic Stories: Bringing Chiropractic to the Solomon Islands

Chiropractic is a wonderful profession, one with such profound potential to impact lives. But in the developed world at least, it’s not without it’s challenges. Politics, registration boards and different streams of practice that don’t always see eye-to-eye can mar the simplicity of adjusting subluxations and restoring the innate. When Chiropractor Dr Brinsley Lane stepped off the plane in Honiara, Solomon Islands, to support his wife in her community development endeavours, he saw a rare opportunity: the ability to bring chiropractic in its purest form to a nation that hadn’t yet experienced it. Originally, his plan had been to sell […]
April 26, 2017

Fasting can trigger stem cell, immune regeneration

Short term fasting seems to have made a resurgence into popularity in recent years, with intermittent fasting re-gaining fame for more than just weight loss benefits. So what happens when we move beyond the intermittent to prolonged fasting a couple of times a week? There is research revealing that fasting twice a week could significantly lower the risk of developing both Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease [1]. But new research has revealed another benefit of fasting or diets that mimic it. It appears that it can trigger stem cell regeneration to help reboot damaged immune systems. The research revealed that “fasting […]
April 20, 2017

Chiropractic Care and Cervical Artery Dissection: No Evidence for Causation

We’ve all heard the scaremongers proclaim a link between chiropractic care and stroke. It’s easy to dismiss with a few well-referenced rebuttals and easier still to reject with a roll of the eye. Recently, a group of researchers took the issue of Cervical Artery Dissection, a key cause of strokes, and put it through the rigors of academia in a systematic review and meta-analysis. The result: they found no evidence for causation. Here are the details on a contentious issue. The authors of the study all hailed from the neurosurgery departments of either Penn State Hershey Medical Centre, Loma Linda […]
April 19, 2017

First Born Children Are Smarter, But Only Because Parents Spend More Time With Them

If you’ve ever had more than one kid, you know by the time you’ve had your second or third, that the once obsessive interest in teaching them how to build blocks, solve jigsaw puzzles and speak a second language has seriously started to wane. It’s takes all your effort just to get them dressed in the morning, let alone sit around teaching them how to write their name. A new study published in Journal of Human Resources1 suggest that first born children are smarter. Whilst many first-born siblings are sitting around nodding, clearly pleased with this assessment, it may not […]
April 18, 2017

Studies Examine Public Perception of Spinal Screenings and the Perceived Effectiveness of Chiropractic Care Received From Patients Through Screenings

Representing chiropractic care in a positive, understandable manner to the public, and indeed marketing chiropractic care to people with no exposure to it, has long been a challenge. In today’s climate, rich with keyboard warriors and poorly-informed media hype, it is likely to stay complicated. It is therefore encouraging to know that new research shows that we have a very effective weapon at our disposal though: the humble spinal screening.  A pair of studies recently undertaken by Dr David Russell and faculty of the New Zealand College of Chiropractic and Life Chiropractic College West have taken aim at the effectiveness […]
April 13, 2017

Listening Better – Enriching Communication In & Out Of The Clinic

“We are losing our ‘listening’,” says sound and communication expert, author Julian Treasure [1].  “The world is now so noisy, with this cacophony going on visually and auditorily, it’s just hard to listen; it’s tiring to listen. Many people take refuge in headphones, but they turn big, public spaces… shared soundscapes, into millions of tiny, little personal sound bubbles. In this scenario, nobody’s listening to anybody.” In a busy world, full of noise and clutter, it’s a valid concern. If we are losing the ability to be present and intentional in the way we listen, what is slipping through the […]
April 11, 2017

Synthetic Oxytocin Exposure May Increase Risk Of Postpartum Depression

Oxytocin has long been hailed as the love hormone – a feel-good  chemical released when we hug or kiss a loved one. It plays a significant role in bonding, and is released in larger amounts during sex, birth or breastfeeding [1]. Recent studies have lauded the possibilities for oxytocin to be used in treating depression and anxiety. However, research recently published in the Journal ‘Depression and Anxiety’ has revealed an interesting paradox. The study looked at the administration of synthetic oxytocin (Pitocin) and post-natal depression and anxiety within the post-partum year, and it held some concerning results. Synthetic Oxytocin has […]
April 11, 2017

Big Decision To Make? Eat First

We know not to do the grocery shopping when we are hungry, as such timing is likely to ensure a whole lot of junk food makes it into the trolley. But research shows that it isn’t just food related choices that could suffer when we are peckish. It turns out we are best to avoid making decisions on an empty stomach. This fascinating little titbit of wisdom all comes down to the actions of a hormone called Ghrelin. It is produced in the stomach, released before meals and known to increase appetite [1]. The only problem is that in a […]