January 10, 2017

Chronic Pain: Is It Body Or Brain?

It will come as no surprise to chiropractors (or indeed any health-care practitioner) that an alarming number of adults in the western world are chronic pain sufferers. It’s a problem that comes in many forms, from tangible disorders like back pain to more mysterious issues like fibromyalgia, but it usually results in a couple of predictable things: painkillers, and frustration as many chronic pain sufferers are told ‘its all in your head.’ The painkiller ‘solution’ is not without a significant amount of risk, albeit risk most sufferers are happy to take in order to reduce their suffering. Yet some are […]
January 5, 2017

Neuroscientists Ask Does Your Dog Love Praise or Food More?

We’ve all secretly wondered if Rover loved us for the patting and the praise or if he was just after that juicy bone we keep in the fridge. Since Pavlov first started tinkering around in the canine brain there’s been a group of neuroscientist at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, who have pretty much been hell bent on working out what goes on behind their furry craniums. The question du jour is do dogs prefer praise or a hot dinner? A new study recently published in Oxford University Press1 is one of the first to combine brain-imaging data with behavioural […]
January 3, 2017

What If We Don’t Have Enough Dopamine?

  People suffering from anxiety and depression have become well versed in the affects of serotonin on the brain. We are all familiar with this neurotransmitter that is affectionately referred to as the happy hormone. Anti-depressant drugs are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI’s). These drugs work by increasing the levels of serotonin in the brain. It does this by by blocking the reabsorption of serotonin, so that more serotonin is available. It’s a clever little trick. In fact it’s the same trick we use by consuming substances of addiction. What we don’t hear a lot about is dopamine. Research has found […]
December 16, 2016

Latest Research: Toxic input from the meninges primes the brain for migraines

Story at a Glance. Negative input from the dura primes the brain to be too sensitive to triggers that are normally not a problem. It appears that nociceptive input from the meninges causes sensitisation of the dural nociceptive system, and that this dura-nociceptive input and sensitisation causes neuroplasticity and may contribute to migraines. This brings relevance to chiropractic techniques that assess and affect the meninges, and their effect on the brain and its neuroplasticity. Abstract – Migraine is one of the most common and most disabling disorders. Between attacks, migraine patients are otherwise normal but are sensitized to nonnoxious events […]
December 15, 2016

Organising Intelligence – Complexity Comes For Free

  The Organisational Result of Intelligence Humanity is now entering a period of radical transformation, and recent advancements in technology are providing generative conditions.  However, within one generation, we have become disconnected from ourselves through the use of artificial intelligence. As a result, we have disconnected from our own inborn intelligence. The answer to solving this emerging problem will come from philosophy.  Over the past twenty years, wireless technologies and the internet have become ubiquitous, affordable, and available to almost everyone. Right now a Masai warrior in Africa has better mobile phone capabilities than the president of the United States […]
December 12, 2016

Smart People Worry More

We’ve all been there, caught up in our anxious thoughts or lying in bed awake at night worrying. But new research suggests1 the smarter you are, the more likely you are to suffer from anxiety, or as they refer to it in scientific circles – psychopathology. This link between intelligence and a predisposition towards worrying has been closely studied over the years. According to Catheline-Antipoff and Poinso2, “The higher the IQ, the greater the psychological fragility.” Research suggest that intelligence and worry may have co-evolved with humans for the purpose of survival. Findings published in The Frontiers in Evolutionary Neuroscience […]
November 29, 2016

ADHD – A New Normal, Or Pathology Of The Brain?

Ritalin (methylphenidate) and dexamphetamine are classed as schedule 8 drugs. In the US, these drugs are prescribed to at least 6 million children for what we have come to understand as Learning Disorders (LD), which includes Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). These psychiatric labels are given to children who we are told have chemical imbalances in their brains, a medical problem, a brain disease, that requires sustained, long term medication to right the body’s incorrect auto-regulation. One source states “The stimulant prescription rate for Australian children increased 34-fold in the past two decades. In addition […]
November 24, 2016
Rejection

Why Rejection Hurts

Rejection hurts. But it doesn’t just hurt emotionally, it hurts physically. We refer to hurt and pain when we refer to our emotional status. Interestingly, they’re the same adjectives we use to describe physical pain. When we break up with a lover, or feel ridiculed or rejected by our peers we feel ‘hurt’. And it’s not just poets that know that a lover’s quarrel or parting can cause ‘pain’. But why is that? As it turns out, it’s because of the way our brains are wired. Researchers from Michigan University’s, Department of Psychology, have been studying the pain of rejection and the results […]
November 24, 2016

Our Walk Is Linked To How Aggressive We Are

Turns out a person’s swagger isn’t just about the way they walk into a room, it’s in an integral part and parcel of a person’s personality. In a new explorative study from the University of Portsmouth in England, has found that exaggerated movement of both the upper and lower body indicate aggression. The lead researcher of the study Liam Satchell said, “People are generally aware that there is a relationship between swagger and psychology. Our research provides empirical evidence to confirm that personality is indeed manifest in the way we walk.” The researchers from the Department of Psychology ran 29 […]
November 15, 2016
male species

Scientist Have Been Working Out Why Men Exist

Scientists have been pondering the reason for the male species. That is, from a biological perspective, the existence of the male sex has been somewhat confusing. What is the value of only half of ones offspring being able to reproduce the species? Why not only have daughters, after all they’re the ones who will birth the next generation? So why do men exist? Research from the University of East Anglia, published in Nature(1) shows that an evolutionary process known as ‘sexual selection’, that is the continuation of sex as a means to reproduce, improves the overall population health and protects […]
November 10, 2016
RESILIENCE at Work

How To Build Resiliency At Work (Part 1 of 2)

According to the Australian Psychological Society1 (APS) survey of 2014, two in five Australians rated their work lives as a source of stress.  Job stress is the biggest cause of absenteeism at work. Professor Dollard, a stress expert and director of the Centre for Applied Psychological Research at the University of South Australia said,  “The surge in the number of employees taking time off for mental health disorders and filing stress claims is one of the greatest workplace crises facing the nation.” There’s no doubt the lives we lead now are significantly different to the lives of 50 years ago. […]
November 10, 2016
Fasting

Fasting After 5pm – Research Shows Why It’s So Good For You

Fasting has been referred to throughout history. The Bible refers to Jesus fasting for 40 days and 40 nights. Muslims fast during Ramadan. And in Buddhism fasting is considered an ascetic practice, one used to invigorate and shake things up! Now whilst we may chose to put fasting into a spiritual context, the science behind fasting is that it is incredibly beneficial for the human body. New research1 suggests it may not only help us live longer, but it reduces age related diseases, increases neurogenesis in the hippocampus (cognitive brain function skills) and reduces cancer incidences. Dr Valter Longo from the University of […]
November 3, 2016

What On Earth Are We To Do About Lifestyle Diseases?

Story at a Glance Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are causing about 70% of deaths worldwide. Focusing on bioscience, pharmaceutical treatment and public health messages have not dented the worrying rise in these conditions. Whilst lifestyle choices are important, it’s more important to influence the environments that have caused the rise in NCDs; poverty, lack of education, processed food, regulation of tobacco, alcohol and unhealthy food. Yes you’ve heard of them before, the diseases we attribute, without trying to sound pithy, to our lifestyle. Obesity. Heart disease. Diabetes. Stroke. Cancer. Chronic respiratory diseases. But they’re not called lifestyle diseases. They’re called NCDs, […]
November 1, 2016

Are Altruistic People Wired Differently? (Part 1 of 2)

Story at a Glance. Emotional, social and moral integrity come from a region of the brain referred to as the amygdala. The amygdala is linked to all of our sensory processing systems and gives a corresponding emotional response to the information processed. Psychopaths have an abnormal psychophysiological response to emotional stimuli, resulting in a reduced capacity to feel empathy for others experiencing pain or distress. It’s an interesting question. Why are some people more compassionate than others? What makes one person altruistic and another self serving? Well, perhaps not surprisingly, the answer lies in our brains. To be precise the […]
October 20, 2016

Unique Nerve Signal Propagation Discovered in Chiropractic.

Recent ongoing research at the University of Southern California, USA, is studying the mathematics of a unique spinal wave generated in Network Spinal Analysis Chiropractic Care.  This research on the electrophysiology of the Network Wave is reinforcing the paradigm suggested by Danish researchers Heimberg and Jackson, which proposes that the nervous system communicates through acoustic, or pulse pressure waves, and that the electrical signal is likely a by-product of this communication. In the mainstream medical paradigm, and often for many chiropractic institutions, biochemistry has been the ruling system. Now biophysics is gaining ground as a way to more fully understand […]
October 18, 2016

Is Leptin The Reason We’re Fat? (Part 3 of 3)

Story at a Glance. Leptin is transported across the blood brain barrier (BBB). Animals who are in a state of starvation display elevated triglycerides that block the transfer of leptin across the BBB. Interestingly, obese people also present with the same elevated levels of triglycerides. This tricks the brain into believing it is starving and therefore inhibits the transport of leptin across the BBB. Studies injecting mice brains with leptin directly into their hypothalamus showed considerable weight loss. In our two previous articles we covered the nature of leptin, a hormone that is secreted from your fat cells. It is […]
October 11, 2016

Superbugs That Don’t Respond to Antibiotics Now a Global Health Threat.

 Story at a Glance. A global health crisis has been declared by the United Nations regarding bacteria and viruses that are now resistant to antibiotics. Overuse of antibiotics in animals and humans has developed resistant strains of viruses, bacteria, parasites and fungi. This has far reaching consequences both to the success of medical procedures, in both humans and animals, and to the cost of healthcare globally. The United Nations called a crisis meeting in New York on the 21st of September 2016, to address what has become a global emergency – antibiotic resistance. Viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites, no longer […]
September 23, 2016

Have We Been Conned By The Water Myths?

Story at a Glance. Whilst there is no doubt that water consumption is imperative for the survival of the human body, there are some well-ensconced myths about water consumption. Your thirst will be your best gauge as to whether you require more water. Tea and coffee add to your water tally, not take away. Dehydration from caffeine is one of the biggest myths It’s a regular sight these days to see the ubiquitous water bottle carried around like a second limb. It’s almost the accessory du jour. Supermarket shelves are stacked with a plethora of option; spring water, sparkling water, […]