June 9, 2017
Shoulder

Clinical Trial Shows Improvement Of Pain & Mobility For Shoulder Impingements After Cervicothoracic Manipulation

Shoulder pain is a problem remarkably common in the general population, with some experts claiming it lies second only to low back pain in terms of prevalence [1]. Risks for shoulder impingement injuries/syndromes include repetitive activities at or above the shoulder line, making this a problem particularly poignant for sportspeople or manual labourers among others. While many treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome are available, and manual therapies are included in this number, the mechanisms by which spinal manipulative therapy improves pain and mobility for this condition have not yet been established. A preliminary randomised clinical trial appearing in the Journal […]
June 9, 2017

Dr Michael Hall Part 1: Brain Diversity – How The Sexes Differ

Diversity and equality are two buzzwords often heard in conversations about pay, human rights, and more – and for good reason. In many areas, the human race has such a long way to go. But according to Dr Michael Hall, a world-leading chiropractor and functional neurologist, the healthcare industry is one where diversity has not yet been fully acknowledged or catered for. In the majority of healthcare practices, we don’t acknowledge and understand the sexual dimorphism of the human brain, or how this in turn affects stress, physiology, and symptomology. Spinal Research caught up with Dr Hall, friend of the […]
June 1, 2017
Walk

Go For A 90 Minute Walk In Nature. Science Says So.

An increasing percentage of the modern population is housed and surrounded in an urban area, and this is trend is tipped to continue. While there are many benefits to urbanization, there is one curious downside. It has been associated with increased levels of mental illnesses like anxiety and depression, though it’s not yet clear why [1]. A group of researchers got together to examine a simple premise: does getting back to nature help?  The premise behind their study was simple. They sent one group of participants out for a 90 minute walk/hike in nature, and sent a control group out […]
May 30, 2017
Kinematics Hip

Study Examines Impact Of Patient Position & Procedure Selection On Spine Kinematics For The Low Back

Procedure selection is an important part of every chiropractic adjustment. Knowing which procedure will stabilise or mobilise more is a significant consideration, depending on the patient’s needs. But until now, no 3-dimensional angular kinematic analysis had been done for spinal manipulation applied to HVLA for the lumbar spine – only to the cervical spine. A recent study published in JMPT in the March/April edition represents the first important step in filling that knowledge gap. The study saw 24 participants undergo a series of 6 HVLA (High velocity low amplitude) adjustment procedures directed toward the L4 vertebra. The procedures included 2 […]
May 25, 2017

Chiropractic Care For Plagiocephaly Cohort Study Released

Plagiocephaly has been called “The most common craniofacial problem today,” by the Royal Children’s Hospital [1].  The disorder is that of a misshapen or asymmetrical head shape often seen in newborns and infants as the thin, flexible bones of their heads are affected by lying on one side more than the other. A newly released cohort study on chiropractic care for the condition has something to say on the issue. Interestingly, the prevalence of Plagiocephaly has increased significantly over the last 20 years, possibly due to the SIDS recommendation for babies to sleep on their backs. Although this recommendation has […]
May 18, 2017

Update The Textbooks: There’s A New Organ In Town

Scientists at the University of Limerick in Ireland have conducted a review which has resulted in a strong proposal for the reclassification of the mesentery. That’s right: it appears there’s a new organ in the body. Whilst it hasn’t officially been reclassified yet, momentum is underway with reputable publications such as Gray’s Anatomy jumping aboard the reclassification bandwagon.    Once upon a time, the mesentery was treated as a fragmented structure. Parts of this structure included the ascending, transverse, descending and sigmoid mesocolons, along with the mesoappendix and the mesorectum. These tissues were individual structures that bore similarities in that […]
May 16, 2017

Optimising Mental Performance – The Chimp Theory

The science of human performance is a fascinating area spanning many disciplines. From sports and exercise to nutrition, neural-plasticity and mindset, there seem to be many roads to go down if you are interested in this area. Where does one begin in order to understand it all? The human brain, the master controller of the body, seems like a good place to start. Dr Steve Peters is a psychiatrist who has spent many years working in the field of elite sport. His twist on the issue of optimising human performance is an interesting one; he calls it The Chimp Model, […]
May 11, 2017

Furry Pets Impact Infant Microbes

They say a dog is man’s best friend. But new research emerging from the University of Alberta claims that they may also be infant’s best friends when it comes to the risk of allergies and obesity.  Researchers have discovered a link between the presence of a pet in the household, and an infant’s microbiome. Their research reveals a decrease in risk for overweight and allergic disease.  The study might seem somewhat unique in its subject matter, but it adds to a fascinating area of investigation as we are only just beginning to understand the impact of the human gut microbiome […]
May 9, 2017
Men's Depression

Men’s Depression Is Different

The more time and research march on, the more we understand about depression. We now know there are implications for gut health and that there may be immune system links, along with the more commonly known symptoms such as persistent low mood, sleep problems and changes in appetite and interests. Adding to this understanding is something that might not be rocket science, but that we should all pay attention to; depression symptoms can be vastly different in men and women, and research starting to support the distinction. According to the American Psychological Association, men are far less likely to seek […]
May 9, 2017

Flame Retardants: A Safety Perk Or Health Hazard?

Since they made their first tentative forays into the textile world in the 1970’s, flame-retardants have become so common they are almost implicit. We rarely see ‘low fire danger’ tags announcing the presence of this chemical cocktail. Rather, we see tags announcing ‘high fire danger.’ What would you rather buy to put on yourself or your child? It’s an obvious choice, that is, until you know what studies are beginning to reveal. It turns out flame-retardants might not be so innocuous, especially for children and babies. Flame-retardants are in our upholstery, electronics, soft furnishings, mattresses, car seats and even clothes. […]
April 20, 2017

Chiropractic Care and Cervical Artery Dissection: No Evidence for Causation

We’ve all heard the scaremongers proclaim a link between chiropractic care and stroke. It’s easy to dismiss with a few well-referenced rebuttals and easier still to reject with a roll of the eye. Recently, a group of researchers took the issue of Cervical Artery Dissection, a key cause of strokes, and put it through the rigors of academia in a systematic review and meta-analysis. The result: they found no evidence for causation. Here are the details on a contentious issue. The authors of the study all hailed from the neurosurgery departments of either Penn State Hershey Medical Centre, Loma Linda […]
April 11, 2017

Synthetic Oxytocin Exposure May Increase Risk Of Postpartum Depression

Oxytocin has long been hailed as the love hormone – a feel-good  chemical released when we hug or kiss a loved one. It plays a significant role in bonding, and is released in larger amounts during sex, birth or breastfeeding [1]. Recent studies have lauded the possibilities for oxytocin to be used in treating depression and anxiety. However, research recently published in the Journal ‘Depression and Anxiety’ has revealed an interesting paradox. The study looked at the administration of synthetic oxytocin (Pitocin) and post-natal depression and anxiety within the post-partum year, and it held some concerning results. Synthetic Oxytocin has […]
April 4, 2017

Study Finds NSAIDs Only A Little Better Than Placebo For Back Pain

An Australian study recently published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases has put the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for spinal pain under the proverbial microscope. The result, pulled together from 35 randomised placebo-control trials in a wide-sweeping meta analysis, is not good news for NSAID devotees. While there is some effectiveness for spinal pain, “the difference in outcomes between the intervention and the placebo groups is not clinically important [1].” Put simply, the difference between the placebo group and the treatment group was only small. When considered alongside the possible side effects tied up with NSAID use, […]
April 4, 2017

If It kills Gut Bacteria, It Could Kill Brain Cells Too: New Study Critiques Prolonged Antibiotic Use

Gone are the days where prolonged antibiotic use is without healthy scrutiny. Even in allopathic circles, there appears to be hesitation when it comes to prescribing antibiotics unnecessarily. However, the potential adverse effects that can be tied up with such use are still being revealed. A new study published in the Journal Cell Reports notes a new concern to add to that file. Studies in mice have revealed that antibiotics strong enough to kill off gut bacteria can also stop the growth of new brain cells in the hippocampus [1].  It appears that researchers have uncovered an interesting clue as […]
March 30, 2017

Study Reveals Impact Of Soft Tissue Manual Therapy On Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, is significant contributor to the burden of disease in many countries. In Australia alone, 14.5% of Australians over age 40 suffer from a limitation of airflow in their lungs. This increases to 29.2% of Australians over the age of 75. It is the “second leading cause of avoidable hospital admissions and a leading cause of death and disease burden after heart disease, stroke and cancer [1].” The causes of COPD can include anything from cigarette smoking, asthma, passive smoking and exposure to environmental pollutants and chemicals [1] to name a few, and to date […]
March 28, 2017

Chemicals In Cosmetics Disrupt Endocrine Levels In Teens

We’re kind of used to the idea that it’s ok to spray a liberal dose of chemicals on a cockroach or a spider. And God help you if you’re an Aussie fly at a BBQ. But have we considered that we might be doing the same things to ourselves, simply by the products we shower with, wash our hair in and rub into our skin? What if the everyday cosmetics we use to make ourselves look and feel better are in fact akin to absorbing chemicals that are no better for us than a can of Mortein? Some of the […]
March 23, 2017

Vitamin D More Effective Than A Flu Shot?

As each summer fades into memory, people head into their local doctors surgery for flu shots – a ‘convenient’ way to avoid the acute respiratory infections and seasonal influenza that are all too common in the colder months. However, a recent study holds some interesting information for us on this front. A meta-analysis of 25 high-quality studies was undertaken and published in the British Medical Journal recently. It found that a Vitamin D supplement was a safe and effective way to minimise risk of acute respiratory infections [1]. The study took in data from almost 11,000 participants across the 25 […]
March 21, 2017

Criticising Others Impairs Cognitive Ability

It’s hard not to jump in and tell someone when they’re doing something wrong. But it appears there is a difference between explaining an error and just being down right rude. In a recent study1, researchers have found that putting people down actually impairs their cognitive abilities and in fact, makes their performance worse. The researchers of University of Florida specifically targeted the neonatal emergency wards in hospitals to see how families of patients criticising medical staff impacted their performance. With thousands of patients dying in hospitals every year due to preventable errors, a team of American researchers at the […]