November 29, 2016

Why We Find It Hard To Get Off Social Media?

You love it. You hate it. It’s like watching a train crash, sometimes you just have to even though you know you shouldn’t. It’s like a New Years Resolution you can only keep for a week. Facebook, let’s face it, is hard to break up with. Researchers from Cornwell University1 have been exploring why it’s so hard for us to quit Facebook and why some of us eventually return. Like any love hate relationship, it’s complicated. Individuals were asked to abstain from Facebook for 99 days. During that period some of the participants returned to Facebook before their allotted time had expired. The researchers […]
November 24, 2016
Rejection

Why Rejection Hurts

Rejection hurts. But it doesn’t just hurt emotionally, it hurts physically. We refer to hurt and pain when we refer to our emotional status. Interestingly, they’re the same adjectives we use to describe physical pain. When we break up with a lover, or feel ridiculed or rejected by our peers we feel ‘hurt’. And it’s not just poets that know that a lover’s quarrel or parting can cause ‘pain’. But why is that? As it turns out, it’s because of the way our brains are wired. Researchers from Michigan University’s, Department of Psychology, have been studying the pain of rejection and the results […]
November 24, 2016

Our Walk Is Linked To How Aggressive We Are

Turns out a person’s swagger isn’t just about the way they walk into a room, it’s in an integral part and parcel of a person’s personality. In a new explorative study from the University of Portsmouth in England, has found that exaggerated movement of both the upper and lower body indicate aggression. The lead researcher of the study Liam Satchell said, “People are generally aware that there is a relationship between swagger and psychology. Our research provides empirical evidence to confirm that personality is indeed manifest in the way we walk.” The researchers from the Department of Psychology ran 29 […]
November 15, 2016
male species

Scientist Have Been Working Out Why Men Exist

Scientists have been pondering the reason for the male species. That is, from a biological perspective, the existence of the male sex has been somewhat confusing. What is the value of only half of ones offspring being able to reproduce the species? Why not only have daughters, after all they’re the ones who will birth the next generation? So why do men exist? Research from the University of East Anglia, published in Nature(1) shows that an evolutionary process known as ‘sexual selection’, that is the continuation of sex as a means to reproduce, improves the overall population health and protects […]
November 10, 2016
Fasting

Fasting After 5pm – Research Shows Why It’s So Good For You

Fasting has been referred to throughout history. The Bible refers to Jesus fasting for 40 days and 40 nights. Muslims fast during Ramadan. And in Buddhism fasting is considered an ascetic practice, one used to invigorate and shake things up! Now whilst we may chose to put fasting into a spiritual context, the science behind fasting is that it is incredibly beneficial for the human body. New research1 suggests it may not only help us live longer, but it reduces age related diseases, increases neurogenesis in the hippocampus (cognitive brain function skills) and reduces cancer incidences. Dr Valter Longo from the University of […]
November 10, 2016
Group from To Love & Serve - Compassion

Are Altruistic People Wired Differently? (Part 2 of 2)

Story At A Glance Emotional, social and moral integrity come from a region of the brain referred to as the amygdala. The amygdala is linked to all of our sensory processing systems and gives a corresponding emotional response to the information processed. Psychopathic brains have amygdalas that on average are up to 20% smaller than normal people. Altruistic people have amygdalas which are around 8% larger than average.  In our previous article we covered the brain architecture and personality traits of psychopaths. In this follow up article we will explore the traits and brain architecture of altruists.    Abigail Marsh, […]
October 18, 2016

Is Leptin The Reason We’re Fat? (Part 3 of 3)

Story at a Glance. Leptin is transported across the blood brain barrier (BBB). Animals who are in a state of starvation display elevated triglycerides that block the transfer of leptin across the BBB. Interestingly, obese people also present with the same elevated levels of triglycerides. This tricks the brain into believing it is starving and therefore inhibits the transport of leptin across the BBB. Studies injecting mice brains with leptin directly into their hypothalamus showed considerable weight loss. In our two previous articles we covered the nature of leptin, a hormone that is secreted from your fat cells. It is […]
September 15, 2016

People Who Exercise Have Bigger Brains.

Story at a Glance In a new study, people who weren’t physically active in their midlife had brains smaller than their peers twenty years later. As we age our prefront cortex and hippocampus get smaller, but exercise may make the brain bigger. People who had lower cardiovascular fitness and higher blood pressure and heart rate response to fitness had small brains nearly two decades later. Just when you thought pumping iron was only good for giving you big guns, science goes and gives us yet another reason to hit the gym. The benefits of exercise just seem to keep on […]
September 8, 2016

Inheriting the Uninheritable.

Story at a Glance There are genetic causes of infertility that you can pass on through IVF. It means that the next generation may be infertile as well. Intra-Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) is a treatment for infertile men in which an individual sperm is selected and injected directly into an egg. Some studies suggest that IVF children born from ICSI may be at higher risk of medical problems, as they grow older, including male infertility.   Infertility affects 1 in 6 Australian couples. 40 percent of those problems will be due to sperm issues, 40 per cent will be because […]
September 6, 2016

Stress, Distress and the Human Spirit

Interest in the role stress plays with the dynamics of health has resulted in a proliferation of strategies designed to minimise or “manage” stress. [1] To many people, the very term “stress” elicits a negative response. Yet, the notion that stress is an enemy we must resist or manage betrays a widespread misunderstanding of the nature of stress and how it affects our lives.  Indeed, it is adaptation to changes in the environment that differentiates the living from the non-living.    Hans Selye Hans Selye pioneered investigations of the biological effects of stress in 1936 with the publication of his […]
August 30, 2016

D.D. Palmer’s Chiropractic Theory of Neuroskeleton

The neuroskeleton is a unique chiropractic model developed by DD Palmer. In 1995, Gaucher, Wiese, and Donahue acknowledged that Palmer was one of chiropractic’s greatest theorists and yet the profession has never made use of his concept of the neuroskeleton as a regulator of tension and of the subluxation as “a mishap that interferes with such regulation and requires an adjustment.”[1] Few chiropractors have read Palmer’s writings and fewer understand his central ideas. Thus, we should probably assume the profession doesn’t really know what he meant by the term. Chiropractors today could easily include Palmer’s model of the neuroskeleton. This […]
August 25, 2016

Stress: The Brain-Body Connection

The concept of adaptation is one that is central to health and indeed to the chiropractic profession. We know the human body adapts to survive on a daily basis. We see this when we encounter a virus and the body adapts to shut it down. It also occurs when we have a fever and the body adapts to take care of it, thus returning the system to homeostasis. We even adapt when we eat, by extracting the nutrients from our food and expelling the toxins and waste products. When the body is unable to adapt to both the internal and […]
August 23, 2016

Can A Brain Scan Work Out How Smart You Are?

Story at a glance 1.     New advances in MRI scanning reveal the level of intelligence in the brain. 2.     The more that different parts of the brain frequently connect with each other the higher the person’s level of IQ and creatively is. 3.     This has the capacity to markedly advance the technology of Artificial Intelligence. It used to be that the only way you could work out if you qualified for a MENSA membership was by filling out a complicated IQ test, but not anymore. These days there’s a far more effective and simpler way of working out if you’ve […]
August 18, 2016

New Scanning Technique Shows More Of The Brain Than Ever Before

  Story at a glance By combining four different scanning technologies researchers have been able to ascertain an unprecedented level of precision in identifying areas of the brain Whilst different scanning techniques show different sections, say connectivity or specialisation, what we haven’t been able to do up until now is to accurately compare the scans This mapping has allowed these scientists to increase the number of known areas in the cortex from 83 to 180, enabling them to add different areas to the brain that we previously thought had already been classified This means that we now have the opportunity […]
August 9, 2016

Listen To Your Gut Part 1: The Second Brain

Story at a glance The human gut has a brain of its own. Scientist are now calling it the ‘second brain.’ Gut instinct is a biological function of the ‘second brain.’ 90% of your body’s serotonin lies in your gut. We’ve heard it a dozen times if not a million. Trust your gut instincts; listen to your gut feelings. Why do we keep referring to our gut as a source of wisdom and insight? Well science might have something to say about that.  We all know that connection between our brain and our gut. It can be as heavy as […]
July 29, 2016

Video: How To Use The New Pelvic Floor Research In Practice

    Click here to read more about this published study.
July 26, 2016

The Three Brains: Why Your head, Heart and Gut Sometimes Conflict

What is a brain? This might seem like a stupid question – it’s that thing between your ears, the grey matter, the master controller of the nervous system that sits atop the spine and under your skull. Behavioural modelling expert and author Marvin Oka has an interesting claim to make on this seemingly simple issue – that we actually have three brains. They reside in the head, the heart and the gut. All three have massive networks of neurons and very distinct roles. It explains the clash between what we think and what we often feel. Only by understanding the […]
July 14, 2016

Can Money Buy Happiness? Studies Say Yes.

If you think money can’t buy happiness, you aren’t spending it right. That’s the claim made by Michael Norton, a professor at Harvard and PhD holder in the field of psychology. It might stand in stark contrast to conventional wisdom, but it seems that science backs this claim. Apparently money can buy happiness, it just might not happen quite the way you thought it would. To put this to the test, Norton and his colleagues went out on campus to find students from the University of British Columbia who might be interested in being in an experiment. Of those who […]