May 16, 2017

Study Shows Neurofeedback And HRV Have Robust Effect On Anxiety And Depression

In fields like chiropractic, we talk a lot about the brain and neuroplasticity. In many chiropractic clinics, tools such like HRV (heart rate variability) are used to measure and mitigate sympathetic drive. Practitioners of this particular technique will be fascinated to know that that on March 16, the journal NeuroRegulation published a ground-breaking study that showed just how robust a combination neurofeedback and HRV can be when applied to anxiety and depression symptoms.  While many of us in chiropractic circles may be familiar with HRV, the issue of neurofeedback may be a little less familiar. It is a ‘non-invasive brain […]
May 9, 2017

Flame Retardants: A Safety Perk Or Health Hazard?

Since they made their first tentative forays into the textile world in the 1970’s, flame-retardants have become so common they are almost implicit. We rarely see ‘low fire danger’ tags announcing the presence of this chemical cocktail. Rather, we see tags announcing ‘high fire danger.’ What would you rather buy to put on yourself or your child? It’s an obvious choice, that is, until you know what studies are beginning to reveal. It turns out flame-retardants might not be so innocuous, especially for children and babies. Flame-retardants are in our upholstery, electronics, soft furnishings, mattresses, car seats and even clothes. […]
April 20, 2017

Chiropractic Care and Cervical Artery Dissection: No Evidence for Causation

We’ve all heard the scaremongers proclaim a link between chiropractic care and stroke. It’s easy to dismiss with a few well-referenced rebuttals and easier still to reject with a roll of the eye. Recently, a group of researchers took the issue of Cervical Artery Dissection, a key cause of strokes, and put it through the rigors of academia in a systematic review and meta-analysis. The result: they found no evidence for causation. Here are the details on a contentious issue. The authors of the study all hailed from the neurosurgery departments of either Penn State Hershey Medical Centre, Loma Linda […]
April 11, 2017

Synthetic Oxytocin Exposure May Increase Risk Of Postpartum Depression

Oxytocin has long been hailed as the love hormone – a feel-good  chemical released when we hug or kiss a loved one. It plays a significant role in bonding, and is released in larger amounts during sex, birth or breastfeeding [1]. Recent studies have lauded the possibilities for oxytocin to be used in treating depression and anxiety. However, research recently published in the Journal ‘Depression and Anxiety’ has revealed an interesting paradox. The study looked at the administration of synthetic oxytocin (Pitocin) and post-natal depression and anxiety within the post-partum year, and it held some concerning results. Synthetic Oxytocin has […]
March 30, 2017

Study Reveals Impact Of Soft Tissue Manual Therapy On Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, is significant contributor to the burden of disease in many countries. In Australia alone, 14.5% of Australians over age 40 suffer from a limitation of airflow in their lungs. This increases to 29.2% of Australians over the age of 75. It is the “second leading cause of avoidable hospital admissions and a leading cause of death and disease burden after heart disease, stroke and cancer [1].” The causes of COPD can include anything from cigarette smoking, asthma, passive smoking and exposure to environmental pollutants and chemicals [1] to name a few, and to date […]
March 28, 2017

Creative Geniuses Can’t Concentrate With Background Noise

Maybe you’re the type that can zone out if there’s a radio playing in the background? Or maybe you’re the exact opposite where just the sound of someone chewing dinner sends you tearing off down the corridor for ear plugs? Well if you’re the later, it may not be all bad news. Scientist from the Northwestern University have found that creative people can’t cope with noise. That is, technically speaking, they have a reduced ability to filter extraneous external sensory information. They call it ‘leaky’ sensory gating. What that really means, is when a person is focused on a task, […]
March 28, 2017

Chemicals In Cosmetics Disrupt Endocrine Levels In Teens

We’re kind of used to the idea that it’s ok to spray a liberal dose of chemicals on a cockroach or a spider. And God help you if you’re an Aussie fly at a BBQ. But have we considered that we might be doing the same things to ourselves, simply by the products we shower with, wash our hair in and rub into our skin? What if the everyday cosmetics we use to make ourselves look and feel better are in fact akin to absorbing chemicals that are no better for us than a can of Mortein? Some of the […]
March 21, 2017

Criticising Others Impairs Cognitive Ability

It’s hard not to jump in and tell someone when they’re doing something wrong. But it appears there is a difference between explaining an error and just being down right rude. In a recent study1, researchers have found that putting people down actually impairs their cognitive abilities and in fact, makes their performance worse. The researchers of University of Florida specifically targeted the neonatal emergency wards in hospitals to see how families of patients criticising medical staff impacted their performance. With thousands of patients dying in hospitals every year due to preventable errors, a team of American researchers at the […]
March 14, 2017

People Who Don’t Like Music Are Neurologically Different

You only have to ask someone like Jerry Maguire, driving his car, flicking through the radio stations searching for just the right song, how important music is. Music when it hits that sweet spot makes your foot tap and your heart sing. It makes you want to jump up and dance, or sing loudly out of tune. Music can bring out the depths of your sadness and trigger long lost memories. It can make you laugh or it can touch your soul. Music has been prevalent in all human cultures since we first started scratching flint together to make flames. […]
March 9, 2017

Heavy School Bags Biggest Pain In The Neck

It’s that time of year again. Kids have been back at school a few weeks and parents are starting to see just how heavy their kid’s backpacks are. Half the weight seems to be in the school bag itself, even before it’s loaded up with books and laptops and sports shoes.  Whilst being stoic and resilient are all qualities we want to see in our children, injury isn’t one of them. Numerous studies have documented the effects of spinal, shoulder and neck pain not to mention the effect on their gait from school age kids lugging around heavy bags1,2,3,4,5,6.  “There […]
March 9, 2017

Hitting the Gym better than Antidepressants New Study Finds

Depression is a worldwide issue. To give you some idea, it’s the number one psychological disorder in the western world1. And not unlike the common cold, it doesn’t discriminate between age groups or gender assignment. Depression is growing in all age groups, the largest increase noted in the younger generations, in our teenagers. At the rate of knots this psychological issue is developing, by 2020, it is estimated to be the second most debilitating condition behind heart disease. Think about it, the neuroscientists at the University of Bern2, have. Traditional treatment for depression is usually with antidepressant medication and psychotherapy. […]
March 7, 2017

Gluten Sensitivity – The New Coeliacs?

Gluten free is everywhere these days. You can’t stop for a coffee in your local café without seeing half a dozen gluten free (GF) muffins or friands. Fancy the GF pasta or pizza? Or how about being alerted to the fact your spicy prawns are GF too? Menus everywhere are touting GF options galore. So what’s going on? Have we all just jumped on the gluten free bandwagon or is this a real issue that requires a genuine diagnosis and intervention? “Avoidance of wheat and gluten containing products is a worldwide phenomenon,” states the study published in the United European […]
February 28, 2017

New Study: Dyslexics Have Reduced Capacity To Adapt To Sensory Input

Scientist have been rubbing their foreheads in frustration over dyslexia, trying to find the underlying cause for dyslexics’ reading difficulties. But it’s not just dysfunction with reading that individuals with dyslexia present, they also frequently show behavioural deficits in perceptual adaptation. Or what neuroscientists call ‘rapid neural adaption’. However, a recent study by neuroscientist from MIT and Boston University may have made the first breakthrough in understanding the sensory processing path specific to people with dyslexia. Part of the dyslexia/reading issue that neuroscience has struggled with, is that the brain doesn’t have any specific area that is connected to reading. […]
February 21, 2017

Curcumin And Berberine – Offers New Hope In The Treatment Of Breast And Other Cancers?

  You would be hard pressed to meet someone who has not been affected by breast cancer either personally or through association. It’s an insidious disease that is ranked second in all new cancer cases worldwide. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women. And it’s showing no sign of abating. Instead it’s been growing by 2% a year. There is no doubt that surgery; chemotherapy, radiotherapy and endocrine therapy have reduced the rate of death from breast cancer. But we are all very much aware of the side effects too. Most anti-cancer drugs are cytotoxic and the […]
February 21, 2017

Epigenetic “Memory” Gene Process Of Worms, Could Be Similar In Humans

  Epigenetics is the study of biological mechanisms that switch inherited genes on and off. The theory is that our own personal life experiences, or for that matter, those of our parents and our parent’s parents, are passed onto subsequent generations. Studies done on survivors from traumatic events, particularly events as catastrophic as ones such as the Holocaust have shown that exposure to stress have a follow-on effect on subsequent generations1. That is, the memory of these events is lived on through our progeny. Their DNA is impacted by the trauma as much as if they’d experienced it themselves. But […]
February 21, 2017

Adrenal Exhaustion The Curse Of The 21st Century? Part 2

In our last article we discussed the nature of adrenal exhaustion and the different stages leading up to it.  Fortunately this state can be reversed once adrenal health is regulated and normalised.  It is estimated that up to 80 per cent of people in the world suffer from adrenal fatigue.  What we want to be careful about is failing to recognise the symptoms in the early stages.  Body aches, trouble concentrating, racing thoughts, irritability and moodiness, tired all the time, overwhelmed, hormonal imbalance and cravings for stimulants to help increase our energy levels are all symptoms of adrenal exhaustion and […]
February 16, 2017

Adrenal Exhaustion The Curse of the 21st Century? Part 1

Unless you’ve been sequestered to mars over the last five years, you’ve heard about it. Adrenal Exhaustion. It’s the by-product of our busy, non stop, super-productive, incredibly overwhelming lives. Like most big issues facing our time, it’s the light bulb’s fault. Before we had 24 hour availability to light, we used to go to bed early, get up early and pretty much eat our veggies and keep a circadian rhythm in tune with the cows. Not so much now.  In fact, not very much at all now.  Our lives are driven by our mental ability to keep pushing ourselves forward, irrespective of […]
February 14, 2017

New Study Links The Pill With Depression

Over 2.5 million Australian women use some form of contraception. The pill, or the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) remains the most popular method of choice. But with IUD’s and hormonal implant popularity on the rise, the ‘set and forget’ method is proving a popular choice amongst younger women and older women alike. This new found popularity may be as simple as the IUD’s and implants ease of use. Once the doctor has inserted the devise that’s about as high maintenance as it gets. It’s quite a different experience from having to remember to take a pill every day.   Hormonal […]